Library News

Spring Break! March 18-24, 2019 Library Hours: 8-4:30 Monday-Friday, CLOSED Saturday/Sunday

We’re halfway through the semester, spring is finally awakening after the coldest winter ever, and that means Spring Break arrives next week, Monday, March 18- Sunday, March 24, 2019. As you finish up your midterms and wrap up your first half-term 8-week classes this week, there’s still time to register for second half-term 8-week classes, … Continue reading Spring Break! March 18-24, 2019 Library Hours: 8-4:30 Monday-Friday, CLOSED Saturday/Sunday

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March 2019 Book Display

We celebrate the month of March as Women’s History Month. Come learn more about the interesting lives and stories of the “fair gender” at the Todd Library.

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Aurora Downtown Campus Library Hosts First Friday Arts Event 6-8:30 p.m. on March 1, 2019

Waubonsee Community College, 18 S River St., will be open with “A Night of Arts – Ceramics, Jazz, and More.” The Aurora Downtown Campus Library will host the High School Invitational Ceramics Exhibition and will be joined by Oswego East and Kaneland High School Jazz Combos. Wheel throwing and tile painting will be available in … Continue reading Aurora Downtown Campus Library Hosts First Friday Arts Event 6-8:30 p.m. on March 1, 2019

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Featured New Books

Take a look at these new arrivals in the Waubonsee libraries.

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Robots and drones : past, present, and future

Presents the history of robotics, from the world's earliest mechanized robots to modern machines used in the home, in the military, and in space exploration.

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Chasing Captain America : how advances in science, engineering, and biotechnology will produce a superhuman

"Could we create a real-life superhero by changing human biology itself? The form and function of the human body, once entirely delimited by nature, are now fluid concepts thanks to recent advances in biomedical science and engineering. Professor, author, and comic book enthusiast E. Paul Zehr uses Marvel's Captain America--an ordinary man turned into an extraordinary hero, thanks to a military science experiment--as an entry-point to this brave new world of science, no longer limited to the realm of fiction. With our ever-expanding scientific and technological prowess, human biological adaptability is now in our fallible human hands. Thanks to the convergence of biology, engineering, and technology, we can now alter our abilities through surgery, pharmaceutical enhancement, technological fusion, and genetic engineering. Written in an accessible manner, Chasing Captain America explores these areas and more, asking what the real limits of being human are, how far we should bend those limits, and how we may be forced to reshape human biology if we are to colonize planets like Mars."-- Amazon.com.

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Ruthless tide : the heroes and villains of the Johnstown flood, America's astonishing gilded age disaster

"A gripping new history celebrating the remarkable heroes of the Johnstown Flood--the deadliest flood in U.S. history--from NBC host and legendary weather authority Al Roker. Central Pennsylvania, May 31, 1889: After a deluge of rain--nearly a foot in less than twenty-four hours--swelled the Little Conemaugh River, panicked engineers watched helplessly as swiftly rising waters threatened to breach the South Fork dam, built to create a private lake for a fishing and hunting club that counted among its members Andrew Mellon, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Carnegie. Though the engineers telegraphed neighboring towns on this last morning in May warning of the impending danger, residents--factory workers and their families--remained in their homes, having grown used to false alarms. At 3:10 P.M., the dam gave way, releasing 20 million tons of water. Gathering speed as it flowed southwest, the deluge wiped out nearly everything in its path and picked up debris--trees, houses, animals--before reaching Johnstown, a vibrant steel town fourteen miles downstream. Traveling 40 miles an hour, with swells as high as 60 feet, the deadly floodwaters razed the mill town--home to 20,000 people--in minutes. The Great Flood, as it would come to be called, remains the deadliest in US history, killing more than 2,200 people and causing $17 million in damage. In Ruthless Tide, Al Roker follows an unforgettable cast of characters whose fates converged because of that tragic day, including John Parke, the engineer whose heroic efforts failed to save the dam; the robber barons whose fancy sport fishing resort was responsible for modifications that weakened the dam; and Clara Barton, the founder of the American Red Cross, who spent five months in Johnstown leading one of the first organized disaster relief efforts in the United States. Weaving together their stories and those of many ordinary citizens whose lives were forever altered by the event, Ruthless Tide is testament to the power of the human spirit in times of tragedy and also a timely warning about the dangers of greed, inequality, neglected infrastructure, and the ferocious, uncontrollable power of nature."--Dust jacket.

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Library Hours

This week's library hours.

Sugar Grove
  • Sun: Closed Spring Break
  • Mon: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Tue: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Wed: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Thu: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Fri: 7:30am - 4:30pm
  • Sat: 8am - 4:30pm
Aurora Downtown
  • Sun: Closed Spring Break
  • Mon: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Tue: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Wed: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Thu: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Fri: 7:30am - 4:30pm
  • Sat: 8am - 4:30pm
Aurora Fox Valley
  • Sun: Closed Spring Break
  • Mon: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Tue: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Wed: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Thu: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Fri: 7:30am - 4:30pm
  • Sat: 8am - 4:30pm
Plano
  • Sun: Closed Spring Break
  • Mon: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Tue: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Wed: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Thu: 7:30am - 9:30pm
  • Fri: 7:30am - 3:30pm
  • Sat: 7:30am - 4:30pm