Library News

Librarian Receives Tenure

Congratulations to Waubonsee Librarian Kathy Bartel on being granted tenure!

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Library Joins New Instructional Division, Welcomes New Dean

Today the Waubonsee Community College Libraries officially join our new division, led by Dr. Jonathan Paver, Assistant Vice President of Transfer and Developmental Education, and welcome our new Dean, Anita Moore, who starts today! We would also like to take a moment to bid a fond farewell and best wishes to our old division, Online … Continue reading Library Joins New Instructional Division, Welcomes New Dean

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A Brief History of Presidents’ Day

Presidents’ Day, the third Monday in February, as we know it today, was first celebrated in 1971, after the 1968 passage of the Uniform Monday Holiday Act moved the observance of several federal holidays to Mondays. Before then, Washington’s Birthday was celebrated on his actual birthday, February 22, and in Illinois, Lincoln’s Birthday was celebrated on his … Continue reading A Brief History of Presidents’ Day

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Featured New Books

Take a look at these new arrivals in the Waubonsee libraries.

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Alone : Britain, Churchill, and Dunkirk : defeat into victory

"Combining epic history with rich family stories, Michael Korda chronicles the outbreak of World War II and the great events that led to Dunkirk. In an absorbing work peopled with world leaders, generals, and ordinary citizens who fought on both sides of World War II, [this book] brings to resounding life perhaps the most critical year of twentieth-century history. For, indeed, May 1940 was a month like no other, as the German war machine blazed into France while the supposedly impregnable Maginot Line crumbled, and Winston Churchill replaced Neville Chamberlain as prime minister in an astonishing political drama as Britain, isolated and alone, faced a triumphant Nazi Germany. Against this vast historical canvas, Michael Korda relates what happened and why, and also tells his own story, that of a six-year-old boy in a glamorous movie family who would himself be evacuated."--David McCullough.

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The great leveler : violence and the history of inequality from the Stone Age to the twenty-first century

"Are mass violence and catastrophes the only forces that can seriously decrease economic inequality? To judge by thousands of years of history, the answer is yes. Tracing the global history of inequality from the Stone Age to today, Walter Scheidel shows that inequality never dies peacefully. Inequality declines when carnage and disaster strike and increases when peace and stability return. The Great Leveler is the first book to chart the crucial role of violent shocks in reducing inequality over the full sweep of human history around the world. Ever since humans began to farm, herd livestock, and pass on their assets to future generations, economic inequality has been a defining feature of civilization. Over thousands of years, only violent events have significantly lessened inequality. The "Four Horsemen" of leveling--mass-mobilization warfare, transformative revolutions, state collapse, and catastrophic plagues--have repeatedly destroyed the fortunes of the rich. Scheidel identifies and examines these processes, from the crises of the earliest civilizations to the cataclysmic world wars and communist revolutions of the twentieth century. Today, the violence that reduced inequality in the past seems to have diminished, and that is a good thing. But it casts serious doubt on the prospects for a more equal future. An essential contribution to the debate about inequality, The Great Leveler provides important new insights about why inequality is so persistent--and why it is unlikely to decline anytime soon." -- Publisher's description

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College in prison : reading in an age of mass incarceration

"This book tells the story of the Bard Prison Initiative--a unique example of academic excellence unfolding inside high-security prisons across New York. Through the Initiative, hundreds of incarcerated men and women go to Bard College full-time while still in prison, and thrive at the highest academic levels the college has to offer. This remarkable student body is demographically identical to the larger population of people in New York's prisons, and thus quite unlike those students who usually have access to, and succeed in, America's leading liberal arts colleges. Those who have graduated and left prison are thriving in for-private companies, leading service agencies, and completing further study at elite graduate schools for academia and the professions. The rigor and depth of what and how these students learn, and the careers they pursue once home, force us to rethink preconceptions about who is in prison, what American systems of punishment really mean, and the continued relevance of liberal learning"-- Provided by publisher.

Library Hours

This week's library hours.

Sugar Grove
  • 7:30 am - 9:30 pm, Mon - Thu
  • 7:30 am - 4:30 pm, Fri
  • 8:00 am - 4:30 pm, Sat
  • Closed, Sun
Aurora Downtown
  • 7:30 am - 9:30 pm, Mon - Thu
  • 7:30 am - 4:30 pm, Fri
  • 8:00 am - 4:30 pm, Sat
  • Closed, Sun
Aurora Fox Valley
  • 7:30 am - 9:30 pm, Mon - Thu
  • 7:30 am - 4:30 pm, Fri
  • 8:00 am - 4:30 pm, Sat
  • Closed, Sun
Plano
  • 7:30 am - 9:30 pm, Mon - Thu
  • 7:30 am - 4:30 pm, Fri
  • 8:00 am - 4:30 pm, Sat
  • Closed, Sun